The Sentinel http://ksusentinel.com The Kennesaw State University Newspaper Tue, 19 Sep 2017 17:02:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.1 KSU sets school record in financial aid disbursement http://ksusentinel.com/2017/09/18/ksu-sets-school-record-in-financial-aid-disbursement/ http://ksusentinel.com/2017/09/18/ksu-sets-school-record-in-financial-aid-disbursement/#respond Mon, 18 Sep 2017 22:36:05 +0000 http://ksusentinel.com/?p=14871 The Office of Financial Aid has disbursed more financial aid money this semester than ever before in its history.

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The Office of Financial Aid disbursed a record-setting $127 million in financial aid to students this semester, according to an announcement on the department’s Twitter.

Sarah Baumhoff, the associate director of student financial aid, said this spike in student funds is no surprise to her. In her five years of working in financial aid, she said there has been a $10 million increase each fall semester.

“Every year that I have been here, it’s gone up every fall,” Baumhoff said.

Within two weeks of the tweet being sent out, the number of student funds has increased to $134 million. According to the associate director, 57 percent of the funding — or about $76 million — has been student loan funds. The other 43 percent — or about $57 million — is scholarships and grants.

“The majority of the funds are either Pell Grant, HOPE scholarship or Zell Miller scholarship,” Baumhoff said. “So that statement is a big chunk of student loans.”

Baumhoff believes that in the future, financial aid will continue to skyrocket due to the increase in student enrollment at KSU.

However, the Office of Student Financial Aid has some concerns about the high number of loans being handed back. When students become star-struck with the huge amount they get back in refunds, they tend to forget they have to pay the money back later.

The state of Georgia has one the highest rates of student loan debt in the United States, with more than 1 million students in Georgia averaging about $30,000 in student loan debt. In a previous study, Wallet-Hub ranked Georgia 12th out of the 50 states for student loan debt.

The Office of Student Financial Aid is aware of this, but financial aid officials are working with students to help them recognize, as one official said, that “a big refund now will result in a big payment later if not used wisely.”

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Music competition gives local artists a shot at the limelight http://ksusentinel.com/2017/09/18/music-competition-gives-local-artists-a-shot-at-the-limelight/ http://ksusentinel.com/2017/09/18/music-competition-gives-local-artists-a-shot-at-the-limelight/#respond Mon, 18 Sep 2017 21:30:53 +0000 http://ksusentinel.com/?p=14865 Students from Kennesaw State and Georgia State will rock the amphitheater on the Kennesaw campus as talented artists from each university compete to win a spot in the finale of the "High Note" music competition on Saturday, Sept. 23.

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Students from Kennesaw State and Georgia State will rock the amphitheater on the Kennesaw campus as talented artists from each university compete to win a spot in the finale of the “High Note” music competition on Saturday, Sept. 23.

“High Note,” is a friendly competition between musicians from each university. It will provide a platform for indie artists to be seen and heard by top professionals in the music industry.

“Ultimately, the objective is to inspire a new generation of undiscovered, talented indie artists and build a spirit of camaraderie among students on college campuses around the country to gain the national spotlight,” said Natascha Sherrod, senior publicist for Jewel Communications.

The producers of this exciting event are senior marketing major Royland Lyons and senior business management major Broderick Armbrister.

“While creating this event, we wanted to focus on involving excitement through a competitive nature, while also developing the right skills and experience in the music industry,” Lyons said. “We wanted to create an entertaining environment while recognizing local talent.”

“We hope the results of this event will encourage musicians and artists to project their music out to the world, possibly creating more local superstars that could potentially receive a Grammy in the future,” Armbrister said.

The competition will be a rockin’ throwdown among six talented artists that will be revealed on the day of the event. An open audition was posted on Facebook and throughout the universities’ campuses to establish the six finalists, three from each university.

The six artists will fight for the chance to move on to the grand finale where one artist will be crowned the winner of the competition.

The preliminary round of the competition will be hosted by Vince Sims — a CBS 46 Emmy Award-winning journalist — and Adam Bomb from Q100 Radio.

A celebrity panel of judges including Kevin Shine — a nationally recognized executive artists and repertoire consultant and CEO of Writing Sessions of America — and Cappriccieo Scates, CEO of Mytrell Records, will determine the winning artist of the “High Note” competition.

The winner of this competition will receive bragging rights and a membership to Writing Sessions of America to perform in front of elite record labels and Grammy Award-winning producers.

This one-day event is free and open to the public. Tickets are available at the door on the day of the event on a first come first serve basis.

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Professor profile: encouraging students to care about communication http://ksusentinel.com/2017/09/18/professor-profile-encouraging-students-to-care-about-communication/ http://ksusentinel.com/2017/09/18/professor-profile-encouraging-students-to-care-about-communication/#respond Mon, 18 Sep 2017 21:30:45 +0000 http://ksusentinel.com/?p=14861 For Lecturer Lindsey Hand, the goal is to get
students to understand just how important communication is.

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For Lecturer Lindsey Hand, the goal is to get students to understand just how important communication is.

In the wide discipline of communication, Hand’s passion is where health communication and media studies meet. The way her students grow their own passions for communication is her priority.

“I like to look at anything that is taboo, stigmatized or hard to talk about,” Hand said. “The uncomfortable topics that still need to be addressed.”

Hand devotes a significant portion of class time to discussion of current events as they pertain to communication. The objective in having discussions — aside from getting to know students — is to show just how broad the field of communication is.

“Discussion is important to break up the monotony of lecturing,” Hand said. “It’s also a good way for students to learn about our field and discuss it. I try to be an advocate for my students and help them see that their voices matter.”

Hand also enjoys seeing the work her students have done. She frequently encourages students to publish their work and even provides a space on D2L for her students to upload their projects.

“A lot of the time, students can connect but also see just how cool the field and how talented a lot of students in our school are,” Hand said. “I think it’s important to highlight the amazing things that people are doing.”

While discussions are improved by having a variety of different perspectives, the larger class sizes can make it harder to develop connections with students. The largest deterrent to effective teaching, according to Hand, is a lack of care from students.

“My calling is trying to make a difference in how people learn about medical issues, but also encouraging people to talk about them,” Hand said.

Hand studied at KSU before graduating and joining AmeriCorps to work with homeless veterans suffering from substance abuse problems. She later went to graduate school for journalism and media studies.

After spending some years in Nevada, Hand returned to KSU in 2009 as a lecturer of communication and media.

She encourages communication majors, along with those interested in the field, to stay active on social media as it is a major avenue for information. She commonly posts about her research and other interesting topics under the Twitter handle @LindseyJoHand.

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Cirque du Soleil’s ‘Luzia’ swings into Atlantic Station http://ksusentinel.com/2017/09/18/cirque-du-soleils-luzia-swings-into-atlantic-station/ http://ksusentinel.com/2017/09/18/cirque-du-soleils-luzia-swings-into-atlantic-station/#respond Mon, 18 Sep 2017 20:25:11 +0000 http://ksusentinel.com/?p=14855 After over a year of being on the road, Cirque du Soleil's "Luzia" swings into Atlantic Station to take audience members on an imaginary adventure through Mexico, where “light quenches the spirit and rain soothes the soul” from Sept. 14. to Nov. 19.

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After over a year of being on the road, Cirque du Soleil’s “Luzia swings into Atlantic Station to take audience members on an imaginary adventure through Mexico, where “light quenches the spirit and rain soothes the soul” from Sept. 14. to Nov. 19.

Cirque du Soleil, or “circus of the sun,” is a Canadian-based entertainment company and the largest theatrical producer in the world. The word “Luzia,” a combination of the Spanish words “luz” for light and “lluvia” for rain, is one of the company’s many shows currently running.

According to Francis Jalbert, the publicist for Cirque du Soleil, the performers present surreal visual surprises and acrobatic performances that bring the places, faces and sounds that make up the richness of Mexican culture to life.

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Photo credit: Jason Mastowski

“We created a world inspired by different influences from Mexico,” Jalbert said. “And we hope people will be inspired by it.”

The artists who provide a vivid array of color and talent are the most distinctive. Several acts take the stage each night, giving audience members a child-like curiosity of what’s to come next.

“We have acts that you might have seen before, but we’re taking them to the next step,” Jalbert said. “The idea is that [the audience] goes through an array of emotions. We want them to be taken away by the journey, but also in awe of the acrobatic act.”

Under the direction of Daniele Finzi Pasca, “Luzia” has received gleaming reviews, including 4.5 stars by yelp.com. One review reads, “the show in itself is a shower of color in every act, and the technology used is flawless.”

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Photo credit: Jason Mastowski

With 44 performers from around the world, culture thrives in the circus environment both on and off the stage. Being surrounded by several different cultures makes the work environment inspiring to work in, Jalbert said.

“We didn’t want to do cliches of Mexico, but rather to bring a more contemporary vision of it,” Jalbert said.

In addition to the performers, 70 staff members travel with the circus, and 40 different job types help bring everything together. From technicians to publicists to plumbers, all are dedicated to bringing the performance to life.

Student discounts are offered on weekday performances, from Tuesday to Thursday. Tickets may be purchased at www.cirquedusoleil.com.

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Financial aid changes to help students succeed http://ksusentinel.com/2017/09/18/financial-aid-changes-to-help-students-succeed/ http://ksusentinel.com/2017/09/18/financial-aid-changes-to-help-students-succeed/#respond Mon, 18 Sep 2017 20:21:55 +0000 http://ksusentinel.com/?p=14851 A new federal grant for low-income students and potential changes to higher education costs proposed by one state senator may change how students pay for college.

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Impending elections and a new allocation of government funds may mean major financial aid changes for current and future Kennesaw State students.

A federal grant program called “Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs”, or GEAR UP, will provide educational funding for low-income students. KSU will receive $106,000 to apply to this program in the upcoming years.

The grant serves an entire cohort of students beginning no later than the seventh grade, follows the cohort through high school, and prepares them to enter college.

Additionally, State Sen. and Lt. Governor candidate Rick Jeffares has made a series of proposals regarding higher education costs for this year. One of these will lock in cost per credit for four years for all incoming freshman, similar to the “Fixed for 4” plan former Gov. Sonny Purdue ran from 2006-2009.

Jeffares also plans to reduce the cost of online courses, ensure general education curriculum is uniform and transferable, and eliminate excessive fees. Ongoing information about Jeffares’ proposed actions can be found on his website.

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OPINION: New financial aid grant gives necessary relief to students http://ksusentinel.com/2017/09/18/opinion-new-financial-aid-grant-gives-necessary-relief-to-students/ http://ksusentinel.com/2017/09/18/opinion-new-financial-aid-grant-gives-necessary-relief-to-students/#respond Mon, 18 Sep 2017 19:16:26 +0000 http://ksusentinel.com/?p=14847 A new statewide aid initiative aims to increase access to higher education for low-income students.

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The implementation of a new financial aid grant at Kennesaw State University is a necessary component for Georgia universities to help vulnerable students pursue higher education with less risk.

In late August 2017, new financial aid came in the form of a $106,000 grant given to KSU by the Department of Education. The funds came as a part of the Gear Up project, a statewide program enacted to help high school students secure their diplomas and muster the capital to pursue degrees in higher education. Money from the program will be used by KSU to help at-risk and low-income students transition into campus life while maintaining financial stability.

According to a Wisconsin Hope Lab study, the number of homeless and poverty-stricken students is shockingly high. Kickstarted by donations made to KSU’s CARE program last year, the grant comes at a time where concerns for students facing homelessness and poverty is garnering national attention.

Aid measures such as Gear Up, food assistance and emergency housing are — of course — humane responses to problems at KSU. It is the responsibility of the community to face homelessness and monetary need with open, creative minds.

With Gear Up, the state of Georgia has stepped up to the plate in tackling the financial side of such problems. By doing so, many students will experience much-needed economic relief in their journies through college.

The effects of such a kind action go beyond goodwill and joyous thoughts. The effects of the kind of action actively not only better our universities but our communities and our state by providing for the next generation of public leaders and thinkers that might otherwise never see such an opportunity.

The funds from the Gear Up initiative actively better KSU by granting at-risk students the opportunity to climb above class barriers to better themselves in the university setting. This, in turn, will create skilled and educated workers and an all-around better community in the Cobb County area. Focused financial aid, like this grant, is a win for everyone, not just those receiving it.

The process of academia is made better when driven minds of diverse backgrounds come together in conversation. Courting the intellect of people from all walks of life is fundamental to creating a healthy academic setting. Diversity of thought is the backbone of academia and such diversity must stretch beyond boundaries of class and wealth.

For individuals working low-wage jobs and living paycheck to paycheck, pursuing a college degree is a major financial risk. The prospect of massive loans and future debt is a major deterrent for many wishing to access academia.

Such a thing may even seem insurmountably impossible for people unable to secure so much as a constant roof over their heads. It is in these cases that targeted forms of financial aid become necessary to incentivize people with low incomes to take steps toward furthering their education.

Public universities are meant to serve the public, and this form of targeted aid is a crucial part of fulfilling that responsibility. In the future, it is critical that KSU and other universities continue to expand such efforts to assist in creating a strong academic culture and, by extension, a more capable and educated populous.

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KSU volleyball ends non-conference play with tough losses http://ksusentinel.com/2017/09/18/ksu-volleyball-ends-non-conference-play-with-tough-losses/ http://ksusentinel.com/2017/09/18/ksu-volleyball-ends-non-conference-play-with-tough-losses/#respond Mon, 18 Sep 2017 19:04:33 +0000 http://ksusentinel.com/?p=14843 It was a rough weekend for the KSU volleyball team, as it lost road matchups with No. 12 ranked Kentucky and the University of Louisville.

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It was a rough weekend for the Kennesaw State volleyball team, as it lost road matchups with No. 12 ranked Kentucky and the University of Louisville.

“I couldn’t be more proud of our team,” said head coach Keith Schunzel. “It took a set to adjust to Kentucky’s height and physicality at the net, but once we did that, it was game on. We not only battled and scrapped like we always do, but we executed at a really high level for much of the match on both sides of the ball.”

Despite the loss, shining moments in the match included Anaiah Boyer racking up her 1000th career kill in the second set and Maddie Jones notching her second career double-double with 12 kills and 10 digs.

“Another huge performance from Maddie Jones, who we’ve given so much responsibility to with passing, defending, serving and attacking,” Schunzel said. “She’s playing with an impressive amount of confidence right now, and it’s awesome to watch.”

The Owls had a quick turnaround as they traveled to Louisville to take on the Cards less than 24 hours after playing Kentucky. The lack of rest worked against the Owls as they lost in three straight sets.

The opening set featured nine lead changes and 18 ties, but Louisville closed the first set on a 6-1 run. The Cards kept the momentum going, winning the second set quickly thereafter.

The final set was a dogfight, being tied at 14 apiece late. Louisville weathered the storm and eventually went on a 4-0 run to close out the set and match.

The Owls finished 6-3 in non-conference and will open up conference play this Friday at 7 p.m., as they face ASUN rival Lipscomb.

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Solid defense leads to win over Alabama State http://ksusentinel.com/2017/09/18/solid-defense-leads-to-win-over-alabama-state/ http://ksusentinel.com/2017/09/18/solid-defense-leads-to-win-over-alabama-state/#respond Mon, 18 Sep 2017 19:02:54 +0000 http://ksusentinel.com/?p=14839 The KSU football team earned its second win of the season Saturday night after the defense held Alabama State’s offense in check, leading the Owls to a 20-14 victory over the Hornets in Montgomery.

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The Kennesaw State football team earned its second win of the season Saturday night after the defense held Alabama State’s offense in check, leading the Owls to a 20-14 victory over the Hornets in Montgomery.

A week after head coach Brian Bohannon emphasized the need for the defense to play more aggressively, they did just that. Although ASU scored as many points as Tennessee Tech did last week, the overall performance by the Owls’ defense was visibly better. KSU held the Hornets to just 195 yards of total offense and forced three turnovers.

The standout performance from the defensive unit once again came from redshirt freshman Bryson Armstrong who continues to impress every week. Armstrong set a single-game school record of 15 tackles, as well as tallying an interception.

Offensively, the Owls did just enough early in the game to put themselves ahead but were not operating at the fast and flowing pace they are accustomed to.

After posting 17 points in the first half, a mix of penalties and turnovers contributed to a frustrating second half, in which the Owls were only able to increase their lead by three points. The most positive aspect of the night was a combined 243 rushing yards from the Owls offense, which helped establish the lead.

On an early offensive possession, KSU had a big play called back after a 46-yard pass from Chandler Burks to Darnell Holland was deemed by referees to have been thrown from in front of the line of scrimmage. With just under three minutes remaining in the quarter, Keon Roman intercepted the ball for KSU and set the offense up for what would be their first scoring drive. Trey Chivers would go on to run 11 yards for a KSU touchdown in the first minute of the second quarter.

A lapse of concentration from a generally focused Owls defense allowed ASU to execute its only major offensive play of the game, a 41-yard touchdown pass to tie the game 7-7.

Later in the quarter, Armstrong’s interception would put KSU’s offense in great field position, and Shaquil Terry ran the ball into the end zone from 25 yards out to put the Owls back in the lead. KSU ended the first half with a 37-yard field goal to make it 17-7 at halftime.

The second half turned into a stalemate, where both teams committed a number of penalties and turnovers. After a second field goal, the Owls had a number of chances to put the game away as the defense continued to play well. With 5:40 left in the third quarter, redshirt sophomore quarterback Daniel David threw an interception on a pass intended for Justin Sumpter.

On the next play, the Hornets’ quarterback threw an interception to Keon Roman. A few minutes later, Terry fumbled the ball to give it right back to ASU, but the Hornets then turned the ball over on downs. This constant back-and-forth of turnovers culminated in a fumble recovery returned by ASU for a touchdown, making the score 20-14 after three quarters.

The Owls were just able to hold on for victory, as sacks by Armstrong and Anthony Gore Jr. thwarted a comeback drive by the Hornets in the fourth quarter.

“Defensively in the second half, as a unit, was about as good of football you could have played,” Bohannon said. “The defense was repeatedly put in tough situations and they responded with a strong effort. I thought the defense did a fabulous job in the second half.”

After a bye week to rest and work on strategy, the Owls play non-conference opponent North Greenville on Saturday, Sept. 30 at 3:30 p.m. at Fifth Third Bank Stadium.

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OPINION: Professionalism in the classroom: combat cursing http://ksusentinel.com/2017/09/18/opinion-professionalism-in-the-classroom-combat-cursing/ http://ksusentinel.com/2017/09/18/opinion-professionalism-in-the-classroom-combat-cursing/#respond Mon, 18 Sep 2017 19:01:09 +0000 http://ksusentinel.com/?p=14835 Professors cursing in the classroom is unprofessional and can be distracting from the lesson they're trying to teach.

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Professors cursing in the classroom is unprofessional and acts as a distraction from the lesson they’re trying to teach.

Think back to your first semester as a college freshman. In one of your classes, you probably had a teacher utter some sort of curse word. Many teachers seem to use more “adult” language in order to welcome their students to the adult world or make them feel more relaxed in a new, more mature environment. They may be trying to make students feel like they can relate to them, or even that they are “cool” and more approachable.

While I have many professors in my department that I feel close to and have a good relationship with, a professor’s primary job should be to prepare us for the professional world and the environment in which we learn should reflect that.

In many professional workplaces, cursing can raise the occasional eyebrow or even get you fired. Even when cursing is more accepted in a given workspace, it can still cause problems. According to an article on achrnews.com, several court cases have occurred in the past few years related to employees cursing in front of customers, or at employers or other employees.

This begs the question as to why it is acceptable for professors to curse in a space where we are supposed to be learning to behave in a more mature and professional way.

I feel that teachers who choose to curse simply for shock value or to prove a point can be cheapening or even losing their intended point altogether.

In my personal experience, most college students still have the reaction they did when we were younger, i.e. “oh, Miss ‘So and So’ said a bad word” accompanied by a few giggles. Even when not said aloud, some students still seem to have that general reaction which can take away from the very point a professor was trying to emphasize and cause the attention of their students to be lost, all over trying to get a cheap laugh.

“I think at that point, it doesn’t make you seem like you have a point, it just makes you seem arrogant and not as smart as you want to be,” junior exercise science major Haleigh Caldwell said. “I mind only if it’s excessive, every other word or constantly dropping things that may be insensitive to other people.”

While I know many students would disagree, I still feel more comfortable and have more respect for professors who don’t need to turn to more colorful language in order to get their point across.

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Club of the week: Ellipses http://ksusentinel.com/2017/09/18/club-of-the-week-ellipses/ http://ksusentinel.com/2017/09/18/club-of-the-week-ellipses/#respond Mon, 18 Sep 2017 18:09:38 +0000 http://ksusentinel.com/?p=14830 Ellipses is bringing together creative writers in an effort to showcase the artistic side of KSU.

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Ellipses works to provide a space for creative writers to share their work and receive constructive criticism.

In the two-hour club meetings, students have the chance to learn from professionals in the creative writing field and receive personal feedback on their writing.

Students with a love for writing and a passion for creating worlds are encouraged to join Ellipses and learn alongside like-minded writers.

“As a writer, you think that you are alone,” said Ellipses President Rae Durr. “Once you get in a club of more writers, and get into a friend group — a family — of writers, you start realizing that you are not alone.”

Since its formation in the fall 2016 semester, Ellipses has grown from only a handful of members to more than 40, according to Durr. Its organizers hope to eventually hold events such as open-mic readings, as well as competitions that students of any major can participate in.

As with any new club, Ellipses’ leadership is still working out how to gain a social media presence and draw in new members. They also plan to establish Ellipses on the Marietta campus to accommodate members that otherwise could not attend.

Despite these challenges, the club provides a place for writers to share their work and learn. Ellipses members use Schoology, a website normally used for classrooms, in an unconventional way to collaborate. Since Schoology is private, the environment is safe and constructive.

“Writing is like a looking-glass into your soul,” said Durr. “I want people who are willing to constructively criticize other writers, not just put other writers down,”

Club meetings are held on the first and third Thursday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Social Sciences building, room 2033. Students that want to join are welcome to attend a meeting, especially if they feel nervous about sharing their work.

“Just come and check it out, feel the atmosphere,” said Durr. “It’s like a family.”

Check out Ellipses on Owl Life to join a fresh club of writers who are dedicated to supporting each other and fostering imagination.

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